Scottish Royal Burial Sites

by An Ard Rí and Susan Flantzer

This list of Scottish royal burial sites starts with the House of Bruce and continues with the House of Stuart.

The Royal House of Bruce produced two Kings of Scotland and one King of Ireland (briefly). It was through a daughter of Robert the Bruce that the House of Stuart/Stewart acceded to the Scottish Throne.

The Royal Tombs of Scotland suffered the most destruction during the Scottish Reformation. Practically all the tombs and the remains were destroyed. The miserable few surviving remains are mainly interred at Holyrood Abbey.

Most Scottish monarchs and consorts were buried at the following royal sites. Click on each Wikipedia link below to learn more.

Robert I/Robert the Bruce, King of Scots (reigned 1306–1329)

Credit – Wikipedia

Robert the Bruce was the son of Sir Robert de Brus, Earl of Carrick, Lord of Annandale and Marjorie, Countess of Carrick. He was elected King of Scotland in 1296 and was crowned King at Scone Abbey on 25 March 1306. Robert the Bruce married twice, firstly to Isabella of Mar (died in childbirth) and secondly to the Irish Elizabeth de Burgh.
Unofficial Royalty: Robert I, King of Scots

Robert the Bruce died on 7 June 1329 near Dumbarton. His body was buried at the Benedictine Dunfermline Abbey, whilst his heart at the Cistercian Melrose Abbey.

His tomb was lost in 1560 when Dunfermline Abbey was sacked by Scottish Calvinist. His coffin was discovered in 1819 during repair work and was re-interred in the repaired vault. The heart monument of Robert the Bruce was uncovered in 1996 and after an examination was reburied at Melrose Abbey on 22 June 1998.
Wikipedia: Dunfermline Abbey
Wikipedia: Melrose Abbey

Isabella of Mar (lived 1277 – December 1296)

Credit – Wikipedia

The first wife of Robert the Bruce, she died in childbirth before he became King and was the mother of Marjorie Bruce, Princess of Scotland.
Unofficial Royalty: Isabella of Mar, Countess of Carrick

Following her death, Isabella of Mar was buried at the Cluniac Paisley Abbey. Her tomb has not survived.
Wikipedia: Paisley Abbey

Elizabeth de Burgh, Queen Consort of Scots from 1306–1327

Credit -Wikipedia

Elizabeth de Burgh was the second wife of Robert the Bruce, King of Scotland. She was of Irish noble descent and was crowned Queen Consort of Scotland on 27 March 1306. Elizabeth was the mother of the last Bruce King, David II of Scotland.
Unofficial Royalty: Elizabeth de Burgh, Queen of Scots

Queen Elizabeth died at Cullen Castle, Banffshire on 27 October 1327 and was buried at Dunfermline Abbey. Her tomb was destroyed by the Scottish Calvinists in 1560, but her coffin was discovered in 1917 and re-interred.
Wikipedia: Dunfermline Abbey

Marjorie de Bruce, Princess of Scotland (lived December 1296 – 2 March 1316)
Marjorie was the daughter of Robert the Bruce, King of Scotland and his first wife, Isabella of Mar. She married Walter Stewart in 1315 and their son was Robert II, was the first Stewart/Stuart King of Scotland.
Wikipedia: Marjorie Bruce

Marjorie de Bruce died on 2 March 1316 following a fall from a horse. The Princess was heavily pregnant with the future Robert II, and he survived although his mother did not. Marjorie de Bruce was buried at Paisley Abbey. Her tomb has survived and is still at Paisley Abbey
Wikipedia: Paisley Abbey

Tomb of Marjorie de Bruce at Paisley Abbey – photo from Wikipedia

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David II, King of Scots (reigned 7 June 1329 – 22 February 1371

Credit – Wikipedia

The son of Robert the Bruce and Elizabeth de Burgh, David became King upon the death of his father. He married Joan of England/Tower, daughter of Edward II of England, in July 1328, but the union proved childless. His second marriage to Margaret Drummond in 1364 also proved childless.
Unofficial Royalty: David II, King of Scots

David II died suddenly on 22 February 1371 at Edinburgh Castle. His remains were buried at the Augustinian Holyrood Abbey in Edinburgh. His tomb and remains were lost during the War of the Rough Wooing when English troops sacked and burnt the Abbey twice in 1544 and 1547.
Wikipedia: Holyrood Abbey

Joan of the Tower, Queen Consort of Scots from 7 June 1329 – 7 September 1362

Credit – Wikipedia

Youngest daughter of Edward II of England and Isabella of France and first wife of David II of Scotland, Joan was married to David when they were both young children. Their marriage was childless and Joan died in 1362 at Hertford Castle in England and was buried at the Grey Friars Church, London. Her tomb was destroyed during the Dissolution of the Abbeys.
Unofficial Royalty: Joan of The Tower, Queen of Scots
Wikipedia: Christ Church Greyfriars

Margaret DrummondQueen Consort of Scots from 20 February 1364 – 22 February 1371

The second wife of David II, King of Scots, Margaret Drummond was born in Perthshire, Scotland in about 1330. She was the daughter of Sir Malcolm Drummond, a minor Lennox and Perthshire lord, and his wife from the Graham family, possibly named Annabelle,  Margaret and David had no children. Around 1373, Margaret died in Marseilles, France. Pope Gregory XI paid for her funeral and burial. Her burial place is unknown, but it is assumed it is in France.
Unofficial Royalty: Margaret Drummond, Queen of Scots

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Robert II, King of Scots (reigned 22 February 1371 – 19 April 1390)

Credit -Wikipedia

Robert II, son of Marjorie de Bruce and Walter Stewart, was the first Stewart King of Scotland. He succeeded his childless uncle, David II, in 1371.
Unofficial Royalty: Robert II, King of Scots

Robert II died at Dundonald Castle in Ayrshire on 19 April 1390. His remains were buried at Scone Abbey which was destroyed during the Scottish Reformation.
Wikipedia: Scone Abbey

Elizabeth Mure

The first wife of Robert II, King of Scots, Elizabeth Mure was probably born at Rowallan Castle near Kilmaurs, a village in East Ayrshire, Scotland. Her parents were Sir Adam Mure of Rowallan and Janet Mure of Pokellie. Elizabeth died before her husband became king.  She was first the mistress of Robert II and then married him in 1346.  They had at least ten children.

Elizabeth Mure died before May 1355 and was buried at Paisley Abbey in Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland. Her eldest son, John Stewart, Earl of Carrick would eventually succeed to the throne upon the death of his father as Robert III, King of Scots.
Unofficial Royalty: Elizabeth Mure

Euphemia de Ross, Queen Consort of Scots from 1371–1386

Credit – Wikipedia

The second wife of Robert II, Euphemia de Ross was the daughter of a Scottish noble and married the future Robert II of Scotland in May 1355.
Unofficial Royalty: Euphemia de Ross, Queen of Scots

Euphemia de Ross died in 1386 and was buried at Paisley Abbey. Her tomb was lost in 1560 during the Scottish Reformation.
Wikipedia: Paisley Abbey

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Robert III, King of Scots (reigned 1390 – 4 April 1406)

Robert III and his wife Anabella Drummond: Credit – Wikipedia

The son of Robert II and his first wife Elizabeth Mure, he married Anabella Drummond in 1367. They were the parents of James I of Scotland.
Wikipedia: Robert III of Scotland

Robert III died on 4 April 1406 at Rothesay Castle. His remains were buried at Paisley Abbey, but his tomb was destroyed during the Scottish Reformation in 1560. A Victorian plaque was erected in 1888 to mark his original burial site.
Wikipedia: Paisley Abbey

Anabella Drummond, Queen Consort of Scots from 1390–1401
The wife of Robert III of Scotland, she was the mother of James I and David Stewart, Duke of Rothesay.
Wikipedia: Anabella Drummond

Anabella Drummond died at Scone Palace in 1401 and her remains were buried at Dunfermline Abbey.
Wikipedia: Dunfermline Abbey

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James I, King of Scots (reigned 4 April 1406 – 21 February 1437)

Credit – Wikipedia

James was the youngest son of Robert III and Annabella Drummond. He became King in 1406 and was crowned at Scone Abbey on 21 May 1424. He married Joan Beaufort, a niece of Henry IV of England, in February 1424 and they were the parents of eight children.
Wikipedia: James I of Scotland

James I was murdered at Perth Castle on 21 February 1437. His remains were buried beneath a ‘magnificent monument’ at the Carthusian Priory in Perth. On 11 May 1559, following a sermon by John Knox, the Carthusian Priory in Perth was attacked by a mob of Scottish Calvinists. Everything was destroyed including the royal tombs and remains.
Wikipedia: Perth Charterhouse

Joan Beaufort, Queen Consort of Scots from 2 February 1424 – 21 February 1437

Credit – Wikipedia

The English wife of James I of Scotland, she acted as Queen Regent following the murder of her husband in 1437.
Wikipedia: Joan Beaufort, Queen of Scots

Queen Joan died at Dunbar Castle, East Lothian on 15 July 1445. She was buried beside her husband at the Carthusian Priory in Perth. Her tomb and remains were totally destroyed along with husband’s in May 1559.
Wikipedia: Perth Charterhouse

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James II, King of Scots (reigned 21 February 1437 – 3 August 1460)

Credit – Wikipedia

Following the assassination of his father, James II became King of Scotland at age seven, with his mother, Joan Beaufort acting as Regent. On 3 July 1449, he married Mary of Guelders, daughter of Arnold, Duke of Guelders and Catherine, eldest daughter of Adolph IV, Duke of Cleves.
Wikipedia: James II of Scotland

James II was killed following a gunpowder explosion at the siege of Roxburgh Castle on 3 August 1460. His remains were taken to Edinburgh and buried at Holyrood Abbey. His tomb, like so many others, has not survived.
Wikipedia: Holyrood Abbey

Mary of Guelders, Queen Consort of Scots from 3 July 1449 – 3 August 1460

Credit – Wikipedia

The wife of James II, she also acted as Queen Regent following his death.
Wikipedia: Mary of Guelders

Queen Mary died at Roxburgh Castle on 1 December 1463 and her remains were brought to the Royal Collegiate Church of the Holy Trinity in Edinburgh which she founded and where she was buried. Her coffin was re-discovered in 1848 and was then moved to the Royal Vault of Holyrood Abbey.
Wikipedia: Trinity College Kirk
Wikipedia: Holyrood Abbey

Photo Credit – www.findagrave.com

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James III, King of Scots (reigned 3 August 1460 – 11 June 1488)

Credit – Wikipedia

The son of James II and Mary of Guelders, he became King upon the death of his father in 1460.
Wikipedia: James III of Scotland

James III died at the Battle of Sauchieburn on 11 June 1488. His body was taken to the Augustinian Cambuskenneth Abbey, where he was buried. The Abbey Church and Royal Tombs were destroyed in 1560 by Scottish Calvinists. During the reign of Queen Victoria, a new memorial was erected to mark the site of the original tomb.
Wikipedia: Cambuskenneth Abbey

Monument marking the burial place of James III and his wife Margaret at Cambuskenneth Abbey – photo Wikipedia


Margaret of Denmark, Queen Consort of Scots from 1469 – 1486

Credit – Wikipedia

Margaret was the daughter of Christian I of Denmark and Dorothea of Brandenburg. In July 1469 she married James III of Scotland at Holyrood Abbey.
Wikipedia: Margaret of Denmark

Queen Margaret died at Stirling Castle and her remains were taken to the Augustinian Cambuskenneth Abbey. Her tomb and the Abbey were destroyed in 1560.
Wikipedia: Cambuskenneth Abbey

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James IV King of Scots (reigned 11 June 1488–9 September 1513)

Credit – Wikipedia

The son of James III and Margaret of Denmark, he succeeded his father as King in June 1488. James IV married Margaret Tudor, daughter of Henry VII of England on 8 August 1503 at Holyrood Abbey.
Wikipedia: James IV of Scotland

James IV was killed at the disastrous Battle of Flodden Field on 9 September 1513. His body was taken to England and buried at the Carthusian Priory at Sheen near Richmond, England. His remains were lost during the Dissolution of the Priory in 1539. His head was hacked off and buried at a church in London.
Wikipedia: Sheen Priory

Margaret Tudor, Queen Consort of Scots from 24 January 1502 – 9 September 1513

Credit – Wikipedia

The eldest daughter of Henry VII and Elizabeth of York, she was married to James IV of Scotland in August 1503.
Unofficial Royalty: Margaret Tudor, Queen of Scots

Margaret died at Methven Castle on 18 October 1541. She was buried at the nearby Carthusian Priory of Perth. Her tomb was destroyed her remains were burnt on 11 May 1559 when a mob of Calvinists attacked the Priory.
Wikipedia: Perth Charterhouse

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James V, King of Scots, (reigned 9 September 1513 – 14 December 1542)

Credit – Wikipedia

The only surviving son of James IV and Margaret Tudor, he became King in 1513. He was the last Catholic King of Scotland and the father of Mary I, Queen of Scots.
Unofficial Royalty: James V of Scotland

He died on 14 December 1542 at Falkland Palace in Fife. His remains were brought back to Edinburgh and buried at Holyrood Abbey. His tomb was desecrated in 1544 during the War of the Rough Wooing and his remains were reburied in the Royal Vault at Holyrood Abbey.
Wikipedia: Holyrood Abbey

Photo Credit – www.findagrave.com

Madeleine de Valois, Queen Consort of Scots from 1 January 1537 – 7 July 1537

Credit – Wikipedia

The eldest surviving daughter of François I of France and Claude de France, she married James V of Scotland on 1 January 1537 at Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris.
Unofficial Royalty: Madeleine of Valois

Madeleine de Valois died on 7 July 1537 at Edinburgh Castle, only a few weeks after arriving in Scotland. Her remains were buried at Holyrood Abbey. Her tomb was desecrated in 1544 during the War of the Rough Wooing and her remains were reburied in the Royal Vault at Holyrood Abbey.
Wikipedia: Holyrood Abbey

Mary of Guise, Queen Consort of Scots from 18 May 1538 – 14 December 1542

Credit – Wikipedia

The eldest daughter of Claude of Lorraine, Duke of Guise and Antoinette de Bourbon. She was the second wife of James V of Scotland and mother of Mary, Queen of Scots.
Wikipedia: Mary of Guise

Mary of Guise died of dropsy on 11 June 1560 at Edinburgh Castle. Her body was taken back to France and buried at the Abbaye Saint-Pierre-les-Dames, Reims.
Wikipedia: Reims
Wikipedia: Abbaye_Saint-Pierre-les-Dames (French)

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Mary I, Queen of Scots (reigned 14 December 1542 – 24 July 1567)

Credit – Wikipedia

Mary, Queen of Scots was the only surviving child of James V of Scotland and his second wife, Mary of Guise. She became Queen when she was six days old. At the age of five, she was sent to France and she later married the Dauphin François (later François II of France.)
Unofficial Royalty: Mary, Queen of Scots

Mary, Queen of Scots was executed on 7 February 1587 at Fotheringhay Castle, Northamptonshire. Her body was buried firstly at Peterborough Cathedral and later at Westminster Abbey in London.
Wikipedia: Peterborough Cathedral
Wikipedia: Westminster Abbey

Tomb of Mary, Queen of Scots in Westminster Abbey – photo from Wikipedia

François II of France, King Consort of Scots from 24 April 1558 – 5 December 1560

Credit – Wikipedia

The eldest son of Henri II of France and Catherine de Medici, he married Mary, Queen of Scots on the 24 April 1558.
Wikipedia: Francis II of France

François II died on 5 December 1560 at Orléans, France and he was buried at the Basilica of St Denis. His tomb was lost during the French Revolution and his remains were also desecrated in 1793.
Wikipedia: Saint Denis Basilica

Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley, Duke of Albany and King Consort of Scots from 29 July 1565 – 10 February 1567

Credit – Wikipedia

The son of Matthew Stewart, 4th Earl of Lennox and Lady Margaret Douglas, daughter of Margaret Tudor. He married Mary I, Queen of Scots on 29 July 1565 at Holyrood Palace.
Wikipedia: Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley

Henry Stuart was killed following an explosion at of Kirk o’ Field, Edinburgh on 10 February 1567. His remains are buried at Holyrood Abbey.
Wikipedia: Holyrood Abbey

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