Hanover Burial Sites

by An Ard Rí and Susan Flantzer

The House of Hanover ruled over the Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (and after 1801, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland) from 1714, following the death of Queen Anne, the last Stuart monarch, until the death of Queen Victoria in 1901.

Official Website of the British Monarchy: The Hanoverians
Wikipedia: House of Hanover

An excellent resource: The Royal Tombs of Great Britain by Aidan Dodson, published in 2004

Hanover Monarchs
George I (r. 1714-1727)
George II (r. 1727-1760)
George III (r .1760-1820)
George IV (r. 1820-1830)
William IV (r. 1830-1837)
Victoria (r. 1837-1901)

George I, King of Great Britain and Ireland (reigned 1 August 1714 – 11 June 1727)

George I became King upon the death of Queen Anne in 1714. He was the first King of the House of Hanover. After the death of Queen Anne’s only surviving child, William, Duke of Gloucester, Parliament passed the 1701 Act of Settlement giving the throne to the Electress Sophia of Hanover – a granddaughter of James I, niece of Charles I– and her Protestant descendants following the death of Queen Anne. Electress Sophia died eight weeks before Queen Anne died, so her son George succeeded to the British throne.
Wikipedia: George I of Great Britain

George I died at Osnabrück in Hanover on 11 June 1727. He was buried firstly at the Chapel of Leine Castle in Hanover, Germany. In 1957, his remains were moved to the mausoleum at Herrenhausen in Hanover.
Wikipedia: Leineschloss
Wikipedia: Herrenhausen Gardens

Herrenhausen Mausoleum where George I was reburied

photo courtesy www.hannover.de

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sophia Dorothea of Celle (lived 15 September 1666 – 13 November 1726)
Sophia Dorothea of Celle, was the wife of George I and mother of George II. George and Sophia Dorothea had an unhappy marriage and it led to both of them having affairs. Sophia Dorothea’s affair with Philip Christoph von Königsmarck led to von Königsmarck’s murder, George divorcing Sophia Dorothea (before he became King), and Sophia Dorothea being imprisoned in Castle of Ahlden for the last 33 years of her life. She never saw her children again.
Wikipedia: Sophia Dorothea of Celle

Sophia Dorothea died on 13 November 1726 at the Castle of Ahlden in Germany and was buried beside her parents George William, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg and Éléonore d’Esmier d’Olbreuse at the Stadtkirche St. Marien in Celle, Germany.
Wikipedia: Stadtkirche St. Marien in Celle (in German)

Casket of Sophia Dorothea on right, her parents’ caskets on the left

 

George II, King of Great Britain and Ireland (reigned 11 June 1727 – 25 October 1760)
George II ascended the throne following his father’s death. He married Caroline of Ansbach , the daughter of John Frederick, Margrave of Brandenburg-Ansbach, and his second wife, Princess Eleonore Erdmuthe of Saxe-Eisenach, in August of 1705.
Wikipedia: George II of Great Britain

George II died on 25 October 1760 at Kensington Palace, London. His remains were buried at Westminster Abbey in a double black marble sarcophagus in the Hanover vault under the central part of the Henry VII Chapel. George II has no monument and only an inscription on the floor marks the site of his burial place. After George was placed next to his wife in the double sarcophagus, the sides of the two coffins were removed so they could be near each other in death. He was the last monarch to be buried at Westminster Abbey.
Westminster Abbey: Royals Burials – George II and Caroline
Wikipedia: Westminster Abbey
Wikipedia: Henry VII Lady Chapel

Inscription on the floor of the Henry VII Chapel at Westminster Abbey marking the grave of George II


Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach, Queen Consort of Great Britain and Ireland from 11 June 1727 – 20 November 1737
Caroline was the wife of George II and the grandmother of George III.
Wikipedia: Caroline of Ansbach

Queen Caroline died at St. James Palace, London on 20 November 1737. Her remains were buried at Westminster Abbey in a double black marble sarcophagus in the Hanover vault under the central part of the Henry VII Chapel. An inscription on the floor marks the site of her burial place. She was the last consort to be buried at Westminster Abbey.
Westminster Abbey: Royals Burials – George II and Caroline
Wikipedia: Westminster Abbey
Wikipedia: Henry VII Lady Chapel

Inscription on the floor of the Henry VII Chapel at Westminster Abbey marking the grave of Caroline of Ansbach


Frederick, Prince of Wales (lived 1 February 1707 – 20 March 1751)
Frederick was the eldest son of George II and Caroline of Ansbach and the father of George III. He was created Prince of Wales in 1729 and married Princess Augusta of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg in April 1736. Frederick pre-deceased his father.
Wikipedia: Frederick, Prince of Wales

Frederick, Prince of Wales died at Leicester House, London on 20 March 1751. His remains were buried at Westminster Abbey in the Hanover vault under the central part of the Henry VII Chapel.
Wikipedia: Westminster Abbey
Wikipedia: Henry VII Lady Chapel

Henry VII Chapel – the Hanover vault is under the central part of the chapel


Augusta of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg, Princess of Wales (lived 30 November 1719 – 8 February 1772)
Augusta, daughter of Frederick II, Duke of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg and Magdalena Augusta of Anhalt-Zerbst, was the wife of Frederick, Prince of Wales and the mother of George III.
Wikipedia: Augusta of Saxe-Gotha

The Dowager Princess of Wales died at Carlton House, London on the 8 February 1772. Her remains were buried at Westminster Abbey in the Hanover vault under the central part of the Henry VII Chapel.
Wikipedia: Westminster Abbey
Wikipedia: Henry VII Lady Chapel

George III, King of Great Britain and Ireland, after 1801 King of the
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (reigned 25 October 1760 – 29 January 1820)
George III was the son of Frederick, Prince of Wales, and Augusta of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg. He became King upon the death of his grandfather, George II, in 1760.
Wikipedia: George III of the United Kingdom

George III died on 29 January 1820 at Windsor Castle. His remains were buried at St. George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle in the Royal Vault he had constructed which is now under the Albert Memorial Chapel.
Wikipedia: St. George’s Chapel
St. George’s Chapel: Royal Connections – Burials

Below is a view inside the Royal Vault at St. George’s Chapel where many Hanovers were buried including George III and his wife, George IV, and William IV and his wife. Caskets were placed on the shelves along the sides. The bench in the middle was used as a temporary place for caskets waiting to be buried elsewhere. None of the Hanovers buried at St. George’s Chapel have a memorial except Princess Charlotte of Wales, who tragically died in childbirth at age 21 and most likely would have succeeded her father George IV to the throne.


Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, Queen Consort of Great Britain and Ireland from 8 September 1761 – 17 November 1818
Charlotte, daughter of Duke Charles Louis Frederick of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, Prince of Mirow and his wife, Princess Elizabeth Albertine of Saxe-Hildburghausen, married George III on 8 September 1761. George and Charlotte had fifteen children.
Wikipedia: Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz

Queen Charlotte died at Kew Palace in Surrey on 17 November 1818. Her remains were buried at St. George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle in the Royal Vault George III had constructed which is now under the Albert Memorial Chapel.
Wikipedia: St. George’s Chapel
St. George’s Chapel: Royal Connections – Burials

George IV, King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (reigned 29 January 1820 – 26 June 1830)
George IV was the eldest son of George III and Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. From 1811 until 1820, he served as Prince Regent during his father’s incapacitation.
Wikipedia: George IV of the United Kingdom

George IV died on 26 June 1830 at Windsor Castle. His remains were buried at St. George’s Chapel, Windsor in the Royal Vault George III had constructed which is now under the Albert Memorial Chapel.
Wikipedia: St. George’s Chapel
St. George’s Chapel: Royal Connections – Burials

Caroline of Brunswick, Queen Consort of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 29 January 1820 – 7 August 1821

Caroline of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, daughter of Karl II, Duke of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel and Princess Augusta of Wales, eldest sister of George III, married her first cousin, the future George IV, in April of 1795. The marriage was an unhappy one. George later tried to divorce Caroline and barred her from his Coronation Service.
Wikipedia: Caroline of Brunswick

Caroline of Brunswick died on 7 August 1821, just three weeks after being barred from her husband’s coronation. She was buried at Brunswick Cathedral in Germany alongside her father. Her casket bears the inscription, “Here lies Caroline, the Injured Queen of England.”
Wikipedia: Brunswick Cathedral

Tomb of Queen Caroline – photo from Findagrave.com


Princess Charlotte of Wales (lived 7 January 1796 – 6 November 1817)
The only child of George IV and Caroline of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, Princess Charlotte married Leopold of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, uncle of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, in May of 1816.
Wikipedia: Princess Charlotte of Wales

Princess Charlotte died at age 21 on 6 November 1817 of childbirth complications following a fifty-hour labour at Claremont House. The child, which was a boy, was stillborn. The princess was buried at St. George’s Chapel, Windsor in the Royal Vault George III had constructed which is now under the Albert Memorial Chapel, with her stillborn son at her feet. The country was wild with grief as Charlotte was second in line to the throne and was expected to be Queen after her grandfather George III and her father, the future George IV. Three months after Charlotte’s death, her doctor, Sir Richard Croft, committed suicide by shooting himself while attending another birth.
Wikipedia: St. George’s Chapel
St. George’s Chapel: Royal Connections – Burials

The very moving memorial to Princess Charlotte at St. George’s Chapel


Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn, Earl of Dublin (lived 2 November 1767 – 23 January 1820)
Edward was the fourth son of King George III and Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz and the father of Queen Victoria. He married Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, the daughter of Franz Frederick Anton, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, and Augusta of Reuss-Ebersdorf, on 11 July 1818.
Wikipedia: Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn

The Duke of Kent died on 23 January 1820 and was buried at St George’s Chapel, Windsor in the Royal Vault George III had constructed which is now under the Albert Memorial Chapel. His daughter was only eight months old.
Wikipedia: St. George’s Chapel
St. George’s Chapel: Royal Connections – Burials

Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, Duchess of Kent (lived 17 August 1786 – 16 March 1861)

Princess Victoria was the wife of Edward, Duke of Kent and the mother of Queen Victoria.
Wikipedia: Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld

The Duchess of Kent died on 16 March 1861 and was temporarily buried in the entrance to the Royal Vault in St. George’s Chapel and was transferred to her mausoleum at Frogmore within the grounds of the Home Park, adjacent to Windsor Castle on 1 August 1861.
Wikipedia: Frogmore – The Duchess of Kent’s Mausoleum

Mausoleum of the Duchess of Kent at Frogmore


William IV, King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (reigned 26 June 1830 – 20 June 1837)
William was the third son of George III and brother/successor to George IV. He married Princess Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen, the daughter of George I, Duke of Saxe-Meiningen and Luise Eleonore of Hohenlohe-Langenburg, in July of 1818.
Wikipedia: William IV of the United Kingdom

William IV died on 20 June 1837 at Windsor Castle. His remains were buried at St. George’s Chapel, Windsor in the Royal Vault George III had constructed which is now under the Albert Memorial Chapel.
Wikipedia: St. George’s Chapel
St. George’s Chapel: Royal Connections – Burials

Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen, Queen Consort of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 26 June 1830 – 20 June 1837
Queen Adelaide was the wife of William IV. She gave birth to two daughters, both of whom died in infancy.
Wikipedia: Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen

Queen Adelaide died on 2 December 1849 at Bentley Priory in Middlesex. Her remains were buried at St. George’s Chapel, Windsor in the Royal Vault George III had constructed which is now under the Albert Memorial Chapel.
Wikipedia: St. George’s Chapel
St. George’s Chapel: Royal Connections – Burials

Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (reigned 20 June 1837 – 22 January 1901)
Queen Victoria was the daughter of Edward, Duke of Kent and Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld. On 20 June 1837, she became Queen following the death of her uncle, William IV.
Wikipedia: Victoria of the United Kingdom

After a very long reign, Queen Victoria died on 22 January 1901 at Osborne House on the Isle of Wight. Her remains were buried at the Royal Mausoleum at Frogmore within the grounds of the Home Park, adjacent to Windsor Castle.
Wikipedia: Frogmore – Royal Mausoleum

Albert, Prince Consort of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (lived 26 August 1819 – 14 December 1861)

Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, son of Ernest III, Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, and his first wife, Louise of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg, was the husband and first cousin of Queen Victoria. They married on 10 February 1840 and had nine children. Many of Europe’s current royalty are their descendants.
Wikipedia: Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha

Prince Albert died on 14 December 1861 at Windsor Castle. His remains were temporarily buried in the entrance to the Royal Vault in St. George’s Chapel and were transferred to the Royal Mausoleum at Frogmore within the grounds of the Home Park, adjacent to Windsor Castle on 18 December 1862.
Wikipedia: Frogmore – Royal Mausoleum

The sarcophagus of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert at the Royal Mausoleum at Frogmore