Royal News: Sunday 2 August 2015

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Royal Birthdays & Anniversaries: August 2 – August 8

Princess Christina of Sweden, Mrs. Magnuson, Photo Credit – Wikipedia

72nd birthday of Princess Christina of Sweden, Mrs. Magnuson, sister of King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden; born at Haga Palace in Solna Municipality, Sweden on August 3, 1943
Unofficial Royalty: Princess Christina, Mrs. Magnuson

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Prince Louis of Luxembourg in the center, with his brothers Sébastien (l) and Félix (r). Photo Credit – www.zimbio.com

29th birthday of Prince Louis of Luxembourg, son of Grand Duke Henri of Luxembourg; born in Luxembourg on August 3, 1986
Full name: Louis Xavier Marie Guillaume
Unofficial Royalty: Prince Louis of Luxembourg

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Charlotte Casiraghi; Photo Credit – www.zimbio.com

29th birthday of Charlotte Casiraghi, daughter of Princess Caroline of Monaco; born at Princess Grace Hospital in Monte Carlo, Monaco on August 3, 1986
Full name: Charlotte Marie Pomeline
Wikipedia: Charlotte Casiraghi

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Princess Irene of the Netherlands, Photo Credit – www.zimbio.com

76th birthday of Princess Irene of the Netherlands, daughter of Queen Juliana of the Netherlands; born at Soestdijk Palace in Baarn, the Netherlands on August 5, 1939
Unofficial Royalty: Princess Irene of the Netherlands

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Timothy Taylor and his wife, Photo Credit – www.zimbio.com

52nd birthday of Timothy Taylor, husband of Lady Helen Windsor; born in Yelverton, Devon, England on August 8, 1963
Wikipedia: Timothy Taylor Gallery

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Princess Beatrice of York, Photo Credit – www.zimbio.com

27th birthday of Princess Beatrice of York, daughter of Prince Andrew, Duke of York and Sarah Ferguson; born at Portland Hospital in London, England on August 8, 1988
Full name: Beatrice Elizabeth Mary
Unofficial Royalty: Princess Beatrice of York

August 2: Today in Royal History

King Henri III of France; Photo Credit – Wikipedia

August 2, 1100 – Suspicious death of King William II of England in the New Forest, buried at Winchester Cathedral
Wikipedia: King William II of England

August 2, 1589 – Assassination of King Henri III of France by Jacques Clement at the Château de Saint-Cloud in Hauts-de-Seine, France; buried at the Basilica of Saint Denis, near Paris
Wikipedia: Henri III of France

August 2, 1858 – Birth of Emma of Waldeck and Pyrmont, second wife of King William III of the Netherlands, at Arolsen Castle in Arolsen, Waldeck and Pyrmont (Germany)
Full name: Adelheid Emma Wilhelmina Theresia
Wikipedia: Emma of Waldeck and Pyrmont

August 2, 1868 – Birth of King Constantine I of Greece in Athens, Greece
Unofficial Royalty: Constantine I of Greece

Royal News: Saturday 1 August 2015

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August 1915: Royalty and World War I

by Susan Flantzer

Coat of Arms of Liechtenstein; Credit – “Staatswappen-Liechtensteins” by SVG Added Ramos – Own work based on: File:Coat of arms of Liechtenstein.png. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Staatswappen-Liechtensteins.svg#/media/File:Staatswappen-Liechtensteins.svg

Prince Heinrich of Liechtenstein

On August 16, 1915, 38 year old Prince Heinrich of Liechtenstein, who served in the Austro-Hungarian Army, died in Warsaw, Prussia (now in Poland) from wounds received in action. The German and Austro-Hungarian armies had occupied Warsaw on August 5, 1915 after a century of Russian control of the city, when the Russian commander in chief of the Eastern Front, Grand Duke Nicholas Nikolaevich of Russia evacuated the Russian troops from Warsaw. The German and Austrian offensive march toward Warsaw had begun on July 13, 1915. It seems likely that Prince Heinrich of Liechtenstein was wounded sometime during the offensive as the Austro-Hungarian Army was involved and he then died in Warsaw which had become part of Prussia.

The name Liechtenstein originated from Castle Liechtenstein (“bright stone”) located near Maria Enzersdorf, south of Vienna, Austria, which was owned by the family from at least 1140 until the 13th century and again from 1807 onwards. Karl I, the first reigning Prince of Liechtenstein, received a reward of becoming a hereditary sovereign prince because he supported the right side in a land dispute between Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf II and his son Archduke Matthias in 1608.

Castle Liechtenstein; Photo Credit – Wikipedia

Until the end of World War I, Liechtenstein was closely tied to Austria-Hungary. The reigning princes continued to derive much of their wealth from estates in the Habsburg territories, and they spent much of their time at their two palaces in Vienna. Liechtenstein’s army had been disbanded in 1868 for financial reasons, and so its citizens and members of the Princely Family served in the Austro-Hungarian Army.

Born on June 21, 1877 in Hollenegg, Austria, Prince Heinrich of Liechtenstein was the son of first cousins Prince Alfred Aloys of Liechtenstein and Princess Henriette of Liechtenstein. Princess Henriette’s father was Aloys II, Prince of Liechtenstein, and Prince Alfred Aloys’ father was Prince Franz de Paula of Liechtenstein, Aloys II’s brother. At the time of his death, Heinrich’s uncle Johann II was reigning Prince of Liechtenstein.

Prince Heinrich of Liechtenstein was buried in the family mausoleum in the village of Vranov now in the Brno County District in the South Moravian Region of the Czech Republic. The Liechtenstein family owned large properties in the area.  Maximilian of Liechtenstein (younger brother of Prince Karl I) founded a Pauline monastery in Vranov and had a grave site built for members of the House of Liechtenstein. The present mausoleum, built in 1812, is in the grounds of the Church of the Nativity of the Virgin Mary, in Vranov, near Brno, in the Czech Republic. There are two crypts in the mausoleum – the Old Crypt, and the New Crypt – containing the remains of all but one of the ruling Princes. After World War II, the Czech government confiscated the properties of all foreigners, which included the princely family’s properties and castles. Since then, the Czech Republic has refused to return the property to the princely family of Liechtenstein, and there has been no preservation or restoration of the tombs and mausoleum.

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Church of the Nativity of the Virgin Mary in Vranov, Czech Republic; Photo Credit – www.findagrave.com

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Entrance to the Liechtenstein Crypt; Photo Credit – www.findagrave.com

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Timeline: August 1, 1915 – August 31, 1915

August 5: Warsaw is taken from Russia by Austrian and German troops in the Third Battle of Warsaw, a phase of the Gorlice-Tarnow Offensive
August 6–10: Battle of Lone Pine on the Gallipoli peninsula, Ottoman Empire (now Turkey)
August 6–13: Battle of Krithia Vineyard on the Gallipoli peninsula, Ottoman Empire (now Turkey)
August 6–15: Allies land at Suvla Bay  on the Gallipoli peninsula, Ottoman Empire (now Turkey)
August 6–21: Battle of Sari Bair on the Gallipoli peninsula, Ottoman Empire (now Turkey) last and unsuccessful attempt by the British to seize the Gallipoli peninsula
August 7: Battle of the Nek on the Gallipoli peninsula, Ottoman Empire (now Turkey)
August 7–19: Battle of Chunuk Bair on the Gallipoli peninsula, Ottoman Empire (now Turkey)
August 21: Battle of Scimitar Hill on the Gallipoli peninsula, Ottoman Empire (now Turkey)
August 21–29: Battle of Hill 60 on the Gallipoli peninsula, Ottoman Empire (now Turkey)
August 26 – September 19: Sventiany Offensive at Sventiany, Russian Empire (now Švenčionys, Lithuania)

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A Note About German Titles

Most of the royals who died in action during World War I were German. The German Empire consisted of 27 constituent states, most of them ruled by royal families. Scroll down to German Empire here to see what constituent states made up the German Empire.  The constituent states retained their own governments, but had limited sovereignty. Some had their own armies, but the military forces of the smaller ones were put under Prussian control. In wartime, armies of all the constituent states would be controlled by the Prussian Army and the combined forces were known as the Imperial German Army.  German titles may be used in Royals Who Died In Action below. Refer to Unofficial Royalty: Glossary of German Noble and Royal Titles.

24 British peers were also killed in World War I and they will be included in the list of those who died in action. In addition, more than 100 sons of peers also lost their lives, and those that can be verified will also be included.

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August 1915 – Royals/Nobles/Peers Who Died In Action

The list is in chronological order and does contain some who would be considered noble instead of royal. The links in the last bullet for each person is that person’s genealogical information from Leo’s Genealogics Website.  or to The Peerage website.  If a person has a Wikipedia page, their name will be linked to that page.

The Honorable Nicholas Mosley

Ludwig, Prinz von Auersperg

The Honorable Kenneth Dundas

The Honorable Gerald Legge

The Honorable Francis Willoughby

The Honorable Gerald Bailey

Adolf, Graf von Erbach-Fürstenau

  • son of Alfred, Graf zu Erbach-Fürstenau and Luise, Prinzessin zu Hohenlohe-Ingelfingen
  • born December 30, 1871 in Fürstenau, Germany
  • killed in action August 13, 1915 in Russia, age 43
  • http://thepeerage.com/p9565.htm#i95642

Joseph Karl, Graf von Schönborn-Wiesentheid

  • son of Adalbert, Graf von Schönborn-Wiesentheid and Princess Adelheid of Löwenstein-Wertheim-Rosenberg
  • born January 25, 1892 in Praha, Bohemia (now Czech Republic)
  • killed in action August 14, 1915 in Miedzyrecze, Poland, age 23
  • http://www.thepeerage.com/p9858.htm#i98573

Prince Heinrich of Liechtenstein

Degenhard-Bertram, Freiherr von Loë

The Honorable Charles Lister

August 1: Today in Royal History

King Fahd of Saudi Arabia; Photo Credit – Wikipedia

August 1, 1137 – Death of King Louis VI of France in Béthisy-Saint-Pierre Castle, France; buried at the Basilica of St. Denis near Paris
Wikipedia: Louis VI of France

August 1, 1402 – Death of Edmund of Langley, Duke of York, son of King Edward III of England, at Kings Langley, Hertfordshire, England; buried at the Church of the Medicant Friars in Kings Langley, England
Wikipedia: Edmund of Langley

August 1, 1714 – Death of Queen Anne of Great Britain at Kensington Palace, buried at Westminster Abbey; George, Elector of Hanover succeeds her as King George I
Wikipedia: Anne of Great Britain

August 1, 1893 – Birth of King Alexander I of Greece at Tatoi near Athens, Greece
Wikipedia: Alexander I of Greece

August 1, 2005 – Death of King Fahd of Saudi Arabia at King Faisal Specialist Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; buried at the Al-Oud Cemetery in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Wikipedia: Fahd of Saudi Arabia

Royal News: Friday 31 July 2015

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The Royal Palace of Madrid

by Scott Mehl

source: Wikipedia, photo by Jean-Pierre Dalbéra

The Royal Palace of Madrid

The Royal Palace of Madrid is the official home of the Spanish Monarchy. It is used for State and ceremonial functions, but has not been used as a royal residence since the reign of King Alfonso XIII and Queen Victoria Eugenie. With nearly 1.5 million square feet and over 3,400 rooms, The Royal Palace of Madrid is the largest palace in Europe.

When the Spanish monarchy was restored in 1975, the new King Juan Carlos and Queen Sofia chose to remain at Zarzuela Palace, where they had lived since marrying in 1962. And upon Juan Carlos’ abdication in 2014, King Felipe VI and Queen Letizia also chose to remain at their home, which is located just next to Zarzuela Palace. The Royal Palace of Madrid continues to be used for formal events such as State Dinners, and was the site of the wedding banquet for the current King Felipe and Queen Letizia in 2004. It is open to the public for the majority of the year.

The Alcazar of Madrid, from a 17th century painting. source: Wikipedia

The palace was built on the site of the former Alcazar of Madrid – a medieval fortress which had been transformed into a lavish palace by Kings Juan I, Carlos V and Felipe II who made it the official residence of the sovereign in 1561. The Alcazar was destroyed by fire on Christmas Eve 1734, and King Felipe V decided to built a new Royal Palace. Construction began in 1738 and the building was completed in 1751, but it wouldn’t be occupied until 1764 when King Carlos III installed his court there. Despite this, the early monarchs spent only a few weeks there each year. Over time, it became the primary residence of the Sovereign, until the overthrow of the Spanish monarchy.

The palace is designed as a square, built around an inner courtyard. The principal state rooms are located on the southern and western wings.

The Southern wing, overlooks the Armory Square and is the main entrance to the palace. It contains the Grand Staircase, the Hall of Columns, and the Throne Room. These rooms were once part of the apartments of King Carlos III.

The Grand Staircase. source: Wikipedia

The abdication ceremony of King Juan Carlos in the Hall of Columns. source: Daily Mail/EPA

The abdication ceremony of King Juan Carlos in the Hall of Columns. source: Daily Mail/EPA

The Hall of Columns was initially part of the apartments of King Carlos III. It is one of the most used rooms in the palace, where the King often meets foreign ambassadors and the diplomatic corps as well as other official events. In 2014, it was the site of the abdication ceremony of King Juan Carlos I.

The Throne Room. source: Wikipedia

The Throne Room is today used primarily in conjunction with State Visits. It is here that the King and Queen are photographed with their guests prior to a State dinner. They also greet members of the government and other invited guests prior to the formal dinner in the Banqueting Hall.

The Western wing, overlooking the Campo del Moro Gardens, contains the Carlos III Room, the Porcelain Room, the Yellow Room, the Gala Dining Room, and the Music Room.

The Porcelain Room. source: Wikipedia, photo by Osvaldo Gago

The Porcelain Room features porcelain covering the walls and ceiling, as well as numerous porcelain objects on display. It was designed and built in the 1760s.

The Gala Dining Room. source: Wikipedia, photo by Jose Luis Filpo Cabana

The Gala Dining Room was once part of the apartments of the Queen, during the time of King Carlos III. It was King Alfonso XII who turned the room into the Gala Dining Room which is still used today for large formal events, such as State Dinners.

The Northern wing, overlooking the Sabatini Gardens, includes the Royal Chapel and several of the former royal apartments. On the ground floor of the Northwest corner of the palace is the Royal Library.

The Royal Chapel. source: Wikipedia, photo by Eric Chan

Once the main Chapel of the royal family, the Royal Chapel is today only used occasionally, most notably for funerals. The funerals of both the Count and Countess of Barcelona (parents of King Juan Carlos) were held here in 1993 and 2000 respectively.

The Royal Library. source: Wikipedia, photo by Fabio Alessandro Locati

The Royal Library, which spans two floors, was begun during the reign of King Felipe V, who joined his personal collection with that of the former Alcazar. Subsequent sovereigns added to the collection, and it was King Alfonso XII who began the task of counting and cataloging everything in the collection. Today, the library contains over 300,000 books, 4,700 manuscripts, 4,100 musical works, 7,000 maps, 200 engravings and drawings and 2,000 coins and medals.

The Eastern Wing overlooks the Plaza de Oriente and housed the private apartments of the sovereigns from the time of King Carlos IV. These rooms include the small Dining Room, the Billiards Room, the Room of Mirrors, and the Tapestry Room. Many of these rooms are used regularly for royal audiences.

The Billiards Room. source: Wikipedia, photo by Jose Luis Filpo Cabana

To the south are two wings which extend out, forming another courtyard known as Armory Square. The eastern wing contains the Royal Pharmacy and the apartments of Queen Maria Christina. Among these rooms is the Crown Room which was created in 2014.

The Royal Pharmacy. photo by Duimdog at nl.wikipedia

Since the reign of King Felipe II, the Spanish royal family have maintained a Royal Pharmacy, to provide them with any necessary medications. The Royal Pharmacy in the Royal Palace of Madrid – set up as a museum since 1964 – displays many of the old bottles and containers used to house various drugs and treatments, as well as the adjoining distillation rooms.

The Crown Room.  source: Patrimonio Nacional

The Crown Room. source: Patrimonio Nacional

Formerly one of the rooms in the apartments of Queen Maria Christina, the Crown Room was established following the accession of KIng Felipe VI in 2014 to display the symbols of constitutional monarchy – the original throne of King Carlos III as well as his crown and scepter; the collar of the Order of the Golden Fleece belonging to Queen Isabella II, and the Table of Sphinxes – the majestic Empire style desk acquired by King Carlos IV in 1803. It was on this desk that King Juan Carlos signed the Organic Act, confirming his abdication from the throne. Also on display are King Juan Carlos’ abdication speech, and a copy of the proclamation speech of King Felipe VI.

The Royal Armory. source: Wikipedia, photo by Jose Luis Filpo Cabana

The western wing houses the Royal Armory, which houses what is considered to be one of the best collections of armor in the world. Read more about the Royal Armory here.

Just to the south of the palace, across Armory Square, is the Cathedral of Saint Mary the Royal of La Almudena, which was the site of the 2004 wedding of King Felipe VI and Queen Letizia.

Learn more about the other Spanish Royal Residences here!

July 31: Today in Royal History

Maria Ana of Portugal, wife of Grand Duke Guillaume IV of Luxembourg, with her six daughters; Photo Credit – Wikipedia

July 31, 1750 – Death of King João V of Portugal in Lisbon, Portugal; buried at the Monastery of São Vicente de Fora in Lisbon, Portugal
Wikipedia: João V of Portugal

July 31, 1790 – Wedding of King Frederik VI of Denmark and Marie of Hesse-Cassel at Gottorp Castle in Schleswig-Holstein (Germany)
Wikipedia: Frederik VI of Denmark
Wikipedia: Marie of Hesse-Cassel

July 31, 1812 – Birth of Amélie of Leuchtenberg, second wife of Emperor Pedro I of Brazil (King Pedro IV of Portugal), in Milan, Lombardy-Venetia (Italy)
Wikipedia: Amélie of Leuchtenberg

July 31, 1942 – Death of Maria Ana of Portugal, wife of Grand Duke Guillaume IV of Luxembourg, in exile during World War II in New York City; buried at the Notre-Dame Cathedral in Luxembourg (after the war)
Unofficial Royalty: Maria Ana of Portugal

July 31, 1966 – Birth of Marina Ogilvy, daughter of Princess Alexandra of Kent, at Thatched House Lodge in Richmond upon Thames in London, England
Full name: Marina Victoria Alexandra
Wikipedia: Marina Ogilvy

July 31, 1993 – Death of Baudouin I, King of the Belgians in the Villa Astrida in Motril, Spain; buried at the Church of Our Lady in Laeken, Brussels, Belgium
Unofficial Royalty: King Baudouin I of the Belgians

July 31, 2004 – Wedding of Lady Davina Windsor, daughter of HRH The Duke of Gloucester, and Gary Lewis, at Kensington Palace, London
Unofficial Royalty: Wedding of Lady Davina Windsor and Gary Lewis
Wikipedia: Lady Davina Windsor

Royal News: Thursday 30 July 2015

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