Royal News: Thursday 29 September 2016

Doing some shopping on Amazon.com? Please remember to use our Amazon link – found at the top of the right-hand column on every page of our site. It costs you nothing, and every purchase made through that link helps to support Unofficial Royalty, so that we can continue to bring you the royal news and features every day. Thank you!

Bahrain

Denmark

Jordan

Multiple Monarchies

Netherlands

Norway

Saudi Arabia

Spain

Sweden

United Kingdom

Make sure to get the latest news updates as soon as they’re posted. Register today as a member of Unofficial Royalty. It’s quick and easy, and completely free! Click the ‘Register’ link in the menu to the right.

September 29: Today in Royal History

Charlotte, Princess Royal, Queen of Württemberg; Photo Credit – Wikipedia

September 29, 1240 – Birth of Margaret of England, daughter of King Henry III of England at Windsor Castle
Wikipedia: Margaret of England

September 29, 1276 – Birth of King Christopher II of Denmark
Wikipedia: King Christopher II of Denmark

September 29, 1328 – Birth of Joan of Kent, wife of Edward the Black Prince, mother of King Richard II of England
Wikipedia: Joan of Kent

September 29, 1360 – Death of Joanna of Auvergne, wife of King John II of France, at Chateau d’Argilly in France; buried at Saint Denis Basilica near Paris
Wikipedia: Joanna of Auvergne

September 29, 1388 – Birth of Thomas of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Clarence, son of King Henry IV of England
Wikipedia: Thomas of Lancaster, 1st Duke of Clarence

September 29, 1560 – Death of King Gustav I of Sweden at Stockholm Palace; buried at Uppsala Cathedral
Wikipedia: King Gustav I of Sweden

September 29, 1766 – Birth of Charlotte, Princess Royal, daughter of King George III of the United Kingdom, at Buckingham Palace
Full name: Charlotte Augusta Matilda
Unofficial Royalty: Charlotte, Princess Royal, Queen of Württemberg

September 29, 1773 – Wedding of Tsar Paul I of Russia and Wilhelmina of Hesse-Darmstadt
Wikipedia: Paul I of Russia
Wikipedia: Wilhelmina of Hesse-Darmstadt

September 29, 1833 – Death of King Ferdinand VII of Spain in Madrid, Spain; buried at the Monastery of San Lorenzo El Real in El Escorial, Spain
Unofficial Royalty: King Ferdinand VII of Spain

September 29, 1853 – Birth of Princess Thyra of Denmark, daughter of King Christian IX of Denmark at the Yellow Palace in Copenhagen, Denmark
Unofficial Royalty: Princess Thyra of Denmark

September 29, 1898 – Death of Louise of Hesse-Kassel, wife of King Christian IX of Denmark, at Bernstorff Castle in Gentofte, Copenhagen, Denmark; buried at Roskilde Cathedral in Roskilde, Denmark
Unofficial Royalty: Louise of Hesse-Kassel, Queen of Denmark

September 29, 2006 – Wedding of Prince Louis of Luxembourg and Tessy Antony at the parish church in Gilsdorf, Luxembourg
Unofficial Royalty: Prince Louis of Luxembourg
Unofficial Royalty: Princess Tessy of Luxembourg

September 29, 2008 – Emma Tallulah Behn, daughter of Princess Märtha Louise of Norway, at the family home in Lommedalen, Norway
Unofficial Royalty: Emma Tallulah Behn (scroll down)

Royal News: Wednesday 28 September 2016

Doing some shopping on Amazon.com? Please remember to use our Amazon link – found at the top of the right-hand column on every page of our site. It costs you nothing, and every purchase made through that link helps to support Unofficial Royalty, so that we can continue to bring you the royal news and features every day. Thank you!

France

Jordan

Monaco

Multiple Monarchies

Norway

Serbia

Spain

Sweden

United Kingdom

Prince George, 2nd Duke of Cambridge

by Susan Flantzer

Photo Credit – Wikipedia

Prince George, Duke of Cambridge was a male line grandson of King George III, a first cousin of Queen Victoria, and the maternal uncle of Mary of Teck, the wife of King George V. In addition, he made a marriage in contravention of the Royal Marriages Act 1772. George was born on March 26, 1819 at Cambridge House in the Kingdom of Hanover where his father was serving as Viceroy of Hanover. He was the only son and the eldest of the three children of Prince Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge and Augusta of Hesse-Kassel. Prince George was born amidst the race for an heir to the British throne in the third generation. The death of Princess Charlotte of Wales in childbirth in 1817 left King George III without any legitimate grandchildren. Prince George was born two months before the eventual heir, Alexandrina Victoria (Queen Victoria), who was ahead of her cousin in the line of succession by being the child of King George III’s fourth son. George was the son of King George III’s seventh son. The baby prince was christened George William Frederick Charles on May 11, 1819 at Cambridge House in Hanover by Reverend John Stanford, chaplain to his father. His godparents were:

George had two younger sisters:

  • Princess Augusta of Cambridge, Grand Duchess of Mecklenberg-Strelitz (1822 – 1916), married Friedrich Wilhelm, Grand Duke of Mecklenberg-Strelitz, had issue
  • Princess Mary Adelaide of Cambridge, Duchess of Teck (1833 – 1897), married Francis, Duke of Teck, had issue, including Mary of Teck, wife of King George V of the United Kingdom
by Camille Silvy, albumen carte-de-visite, 9 October 1860

(George’s mother and youngest sister) Princess Augusta Wilhelmina Louisa, Duchess of Cambridge; Princess Mary Adelaide, Duchess of Teck by Camille Silvy, albumen carte-de-visite, 9 October 1860 NPG Ax46799 © National Portrait Gallery, London

George received his early education from tutors in Hanover, and then beginning in 1830, from Reverand J. R. Wood, a canon of Worcester Cathedral. Like his father, George had a career in the army, starting as a colonel in the Hanoverian army when he was 18 years old, and then as a brevet colonel in the British army. George saw action in the Crimean War (1853-1856) and participated in the Battle of the Alma, Battle of Balaclava, Battle of Inkerman, and at the Siege of Sevastopol.

He held the following positions in the British army:

  • 1842–1852: Colonel of the 17th Regiment of (Light) Dragoons (Lancers)
  • 1852–1861: Colonel of the Scots Fusilier Guards
  • 1856–1895: Commander-in-Chief of the Forces
  • 1861–1904: Colonel of the Grenadier Guards
  • 1856: Promoted to General
  • 1862: Promoted to Field Marshal

As Commander-in-Chief of the Forces, George took a traditional view and was very reluctant to changing promotions from being based on social position to being based on merit. The armies of Germany and France were prodigious in the amount of military research and writing they produced, while the British army did very little. As a result, the British Army was not progressing and advancing as were other European armies. George did institute some reforms: establishment of the Staff College and the Royal Military School of Music, promotion of a plan of annual military maneuvers, and a restriction of corporal punishment. Following the defeat of France in the Franco-Prussian War (1870-1871), Prime Minister William Gladstone and Secretary of State for War Edward Cardwell called for major reforms in the British Army. A number of reforms were instituted, many of which George was against. This disagreement occurred over a long period, and George resisted pressure to resign for several years until Queen Victoria advised him to resign his position as Commander-in-Chief of the Forces in 1895.

George in 1855; Photo Credit – Wikipedia

In 1840, George met an actress, Sarah Louisa Fairbrother, known as Louisa, born in 1816 in London, and the daughter of a servant. In 1832, despite her parents’ opposition, Louisa started an acting career at the Drury Lane Theater in London and developed a reputation as a pantomime actress. She also appeared in plays at the Lyceum, Royal Opera House and Covent Garden Theatre, all in London. In 1839, Louisa gave birth to a son Charles Manners Sutton Fairbrother, who was probably the son of Charles Manners-Sutton, 2nd Viscount Canterbury.

It is known that Louisa and George first met on February 10, 1840, the wedding day of his first cousin Queen Victoria, because George recorded the meeting in his diary. George had been considered by Victoria’s predecessor King William IV as a potential husband for his niece, but instead, Victoria married another first cousin, Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. In 1841, Louisa gave birth to a daughter Louisa Catherine, It is thought that Louisa Catherine was the daughter of an army officer Thomas Bernard of Castle Bernard, in Kinnitty, County Offaly, Ireland. However, Louisa Catherine used the name FitzGeorge at her marriage and was present at George’s death. Louisa definitely gave birth to two sons of George in 1843 and 1847. While pregnant with her second son, Louisa married George on January 8, 1847 at St. John Clerkenwell in London.

by Richard James Lane, printed by JÈrÈmie Graf, published by John Mitchell, after Alfred Edward Chalon, lithograph, published December 1839

Louisa Fairbrother (‘Mrs FitzGeorge’) as Columbine by Richard James Lane, printed by Jérémie Graf, published by John Mitchell, after Alfred Edward Chalon, lithograph, published December 1839 NPG D22385 © National Portrait Gallery, London

In 1772, the Royal Marriages Act was passed because two brothers of King George III had made marriages that the King considered very unsuitable. The Royal Marriages Act said that no descendant of King George II, other than the issue of princesses who had married into foreign families, could marry without the consent of the sovereign. In addition, any member of the Royal Family over the age of 25 who had been refused the sovereign’s consent could marry one year after giving notice to the Privy Council of their intention to marry unless both houses of Parliament declared their disapproval. Any marriage in contravention of the act was void, and any children would be illegitimate and not have any succession rights. A member of the Royal Family who contracted such a marriage would not lose his or her place in the succession. George and Louisa’s marriage was in contravention of the Royal Marriages Act, any children born of the marriage would be considered illegitimate, and Louisa would be unable to be styled and titled as befitted the wife of George. Instead, Louisa was first known as Mrs. Fairbrother and later as Mrs. FitzGeorge, and Louisa’s existence was ignored by Queen Victoria. In 1850, George’s father died and George became the 2nd Duke of Cambridge.

Sarah Louisa Fairbrother as Abdullah in Open Sesame, staged in 1844; Credit – Wikipedia

George and Louisa’s three sons:

George provided Louisa and her children with a house at 6 Queen Street in the Mayfair section of London, which was close to where George lived at Gloucester House in the Piccadilly section of London. However, George continued to have affairs. Louisa died at her Queen Street home on January 12, 1890 at the age of 73. She was buried in the mausoleum that George had built for them at Kensal Green Cemetery in Kensal Green, London, England.

Prince George, Duke of Cambridge, 1883; Credit – Wikipedia

George’s health began to fail as he grew older. He had hearing loss and his strength and physical stamina diminished. George attended the funeral of his cousin Queen Victoria in 1901, but had to ride in a carriage instead of ride on a horse as he wished. On March 17, 1904, Prince George, Duke of Cambridge died at his home, Gloucester House at the age of 84. After a funeral service at Westminster Abbey on March 22, 1904, George was buried next to Louisa in the mausoleum at Kensal Green Cemetery. Because George’s sons were illegitimate, his title Duke of Cambridge became extinct. 107 years later, the title Duke of Cambridge was created for Prince William, his father’s great great great great grandson, on the occasion of William’s wedding.

Duke of Cambridge’s mausoleum; Photo Credit – Wikipedia

Wikipedia: Prince George, Duke of Cambridge

Works Cited
“Prince George, Duke of Cambridge.” Wikipedia. N.p.: Wikimedia Foundation, 21 July 2016. Web. 15 Aug. 2016.
“Sarah Louisa Fairbrother.” Wikipedia. N.p.: Wikimedia Foundation, 28 May 2016. Web. 15 Aug. 2016.
Williamson, David. Brewer’s British Royalty. London: Cassell, 1996. Print.

September 28: Today in Royal History

King Carlos I of Portugal, Photo Credit – Wikipedia

September 28, 1663 – Birth of Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton, illegitimate son of King Charles II of England by Barbara Palmer, 1st Duchess of Cleveland
Wikipedia: Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton

September 28, 1745 – “God Save the King” sung for the first time at the Drury Lane Theatre, London
Wikipedia: God Save the King

September 28, 1828 – Birth of Antoinette de Mérode-Westerloo, wife of Prince Charles III of Monaco, in Brussels, Belgium
Wikipedia: Antoinette de Mérode-Westerloo

September 28, 1863 – Birth of King Carlos I of Portugal in Lisbon, Portugal
Unofficial Royalty: King Carlos I of Portugal

September 28, 1865 – Birth of Amélie of Orléans, wife of King Carlos I of Portugal, in Twickenham, United Kingdom
Unofficial Royalty: Amélie of Orléans, Queen of Portugal

September 28, 1893 – Birth of Prince Felix of Bourbon-Parma, husband of Grand Duchess Charlotte of Luxembourg, in Schwarzau am Steinfeld, Austria-Hungary
Unofficial Royalty: Prince Felix of Bourbon-Parma

September 28, 1907 – Death of Friedrich I, Grand Duke of Baden at his summer residence at the island of Mainau, Germany
Wikipedia: Friedrich I, Grand Duke of Baden

Royal News: Tuesday 27 September 2016

Doing some shopping on Amazon.com? Please remember to use our Amazon link – found at the top of the right-hand column on every page of our site. It costs you nothing, and every purchase made through that link helps to support Unofficial Royalty, so that we can continue to bring you the royal news and features every day. Thank you!

Bahrain

Denmark

Jordan

Monaco

Multiple Monarchies

Netherlands

Saudi Arabia

Serbia

Spain

Sweden

United Kingdom

Make sure to get the latest news updates as soon as they’re posted. Register today as a member of Unofficial Royalty. It’s quick and easy, and completely free! Click the ‘Register’ link in the menu to the right.

September 27: Today in Royal History

Sophia Alekseyevna, Regent of Russia, Photo Credit – Wikipedia

September 27, 1657 – Birth of Sophia Alekseyevna, Regent of Russia, daughter of Tsar Alexei I of Russia, in Moscow, Russia
Wikipedia: Sophia Alekseyevna

September 27, 1781 – Birth of King William I of Württemberg in Lüben (Poland)
Wikipedia: King William I of Württemberg

September 27, 1760 – Death of Maria Amalia of Saxony, wife of King Charles III of Spain; buried at the Monastery of San Lorenzo El Real in El Escorial, Spain
Wikipedia: Maria Amalia of Saxony

September 27, 1788 – Death of Augusta of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, first wife of King Frederick I of Württemberg, at Koluvere Manor, Kullamaa near Reval, Estonia; buried at the Church of Kullamaa in Lääne County, Estonia
Augusta’s husband was violent towards her.  She was offered refuge from Catherine the Great of Russia, mother-in-law of her husband’s sister, at her imperial estate in Estonia.  It is there that Augusta died.
Wikipedia: Augusta of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel

September 27, 1922 – Abdication of King Constantine I of Greece
Unofficial Royalty: King Constantine I of Greece

September 27, 1967 – Death of Prince Felix Yussupov, one of the assassins of Rasputin, husband of Princess Irina Alexandrovna of Russia, in Paris, France; buried at Sainte-Geneviève-des-Bois Russian Cemetery near Paris
Wikipedia: Felix Yussupov

September 27, 1996 – Birth of Princess Iman bint Abdullah, daughter of King Abdullah II of Jordan, in Amman, Jordan
Wikipedia: Princess Iman bint Abdullah

 

Royal News: Monday, 26 September 2016

Doing some shopping on Amazon.com? Please remember to use our Amazon link – found at the top of the right-hand column on every page of our site. It costs you nothing, and every purchase made through that link helps to support Unofficial Royalty, so that we can continue to bring you the royal news and features every day. Thank you!

Japan
Ozy: When Japan’s Emperor Dropped His Kimono
Today: Japan’s Emperor Akihito to host lunch for PM Lee

UK
BBC: Prince Charles leads memorial to fallen police officers
BBC: Rare chance to see Cambridges as a family of four
BBC: William and Kate travel in sea plane on tour of Canada
BBC: Royals in Canada: Images of William, Kate and children on tour
Daily Mail: Lots of cake, a military fitness regime – and nearly killed by a builder’s van: ROBERT HARDMAN on the Countess of Wessex’s gruelling Scotland to London cycle challenge
Daily Mail: A hug for mummy! Countess of Wessex is greeted by daughter Lady Louise and a VERY excited Prince Edward as she completes 450-mile cycle at Buckingham Palace
Daily Mail: Sophie’s 450-mile cycling challenge ends in triumph at Buckingham Palace
Daily Mail: Even princes can’t avoid a little wobble after a 10-hour flight! Kate and William have a royal job keeping George in line as he smiles, frowns and even snubs the PM’s high five when the family touch down in Canada
Daily Mail: Sorry, one doesn’t high five with commoners: Canada’s PM is left hanging as he attempts an awkward greeting with a VERY unimpressed Prince George at the start of the Royal tour
Daily Mail: Young Prince George shuns high-five, low-five from Canada’s Trudeau
Daily Mail: Round One to Kate in the fashion face-off: How a mismatching purple hat stopped Canada’s First Lady Sophie Gregoire-Trudeau outdressing the dazzling duchess
Daily Mail: Daring duchess! Kate ditches the demure look (and her kids) and flaunts her legs in a £4,000 McQueen dress as she and Wills join the equally glamorous Trudeaus on a tour of Vancouver
Daily Mail: ‘No Kings, No Landlords’: Anti-Royalist protesters brandish makeshift GUILLOTINE as they storm day two of Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’s tour
Daily Mail: ‘They look like they were dressed in the 1950s!’: The young Royals fail to impress Twitter users as they pull out all the stops to ensure they look picture perfect for their trip to Canada
Daily Mail: Britain’s Prince William, Kate tour Vancouver without kids
Daily Mail: Views mesmerize William and Kate on sea plane trip
Daily Mail: REVEALED: Computer-obsessed ‘hacker, 35, who plundered Pippa Middleton’s iCloud account before offering to sell a huge cache of images for at least £50,000’
Daily Mail: Man bailed over claims Pippa Middleton’s account was hacked
Daily Mail: The princesses, an author, and their slave-owning ancestors: Beatrice, Eugenie and Jane Austen all revealed to have links to families who got rich from the human trade
Daily Mail: ‘My wedding date’: Karlie Kloss shares a selfie with Princess Beatrice at lavish French ceremony
Express: Prince William admits he didn’t read briefing papers on Diana link to charity
Express: ‘Playing all afternoon’ Prince George and Princess Charlotte showered with gifts in Canada
Express: Duke and Duchess of Cambridge touch down in Vancouver on day two of royal tour
Express: Princess Charlotte and Prince George were ‘super excited’ about flying, gushes Kate
Express: Prince George and Princess Charlotte ‘sleep soundly’ as Kate and Wills get on with the job
Express: Duchess Kate faces style challenge with Canadian PM’s fashionista wife Sophie
Express: Prince Edward welcomes Sophie back after Countess competes epic 445-mile bike ride
Getty Images: National Police Memorial Day Service
Getty Images: The Countess of Wessex attends Buckingham Palace to receive Diamond Pin for completing her Diamond Challenge
Getty Images: 2016 Royal Tour To Canada Of The Duke And Duchess Of Cambridge – Vancouver, British Columbia
Getty Images: 2016 Royal Tour To Canada Of The Duke And Duchess Of Cambridge – Vancouver, British Columbia
Getty Images: 2016 Royal Tour To Canada Of The Duke And Duchess Of Cambridge – Vancouver, British Columbia
Guardian: William and Kate’s children kick off Canada tour – video
Guardian: Prince William and Kate’s children begin ‘lifetime of friendship’ with Canada
Guardian: Canada’s Great Bear forest comes under Commonwealth canopy
Guardian: Prince George rebuffs Justin Trudeau – video
Guardian: No five: Prince George refuses greeting from Canada’s Justin Trudeau
Hello: Prince William and Kate meet their match in Canada: the Trudeaus
Hello: LIVE: Prince William and Kate arrive in Canada with Prince George and Princess Charlotte
Hello: Prince George and Princess Charlotte ‘fast asleep’ after arriving in Canada – see the video
Hello: William and Kate touch down in Vancouver – on board a sea plane!
Hello: Duchess Kate shows off her maternal side during visit to pregnancy center
Hello: William and Kate head off on a hovercraft after busy day of engagements in Vancouver
Prince of Wales: The Prince of Wales attends the National Police Memorial Day Service at St Paul’s Cathedral
The Sun: PIPPA SUSPECT REVEALED
Telegraph: The fashion-forward Duchess of Cambridge blends British design with Canadian colours in experimental Alexander McQueen to visit Vancouver
Telegraph: Prince George and Princess Charlotte revel in a little mischief on Canadian tour
Telegraph: Prince George and Princess Charlotte are adorable in matching blue outfits as they land in Canada
Telegraph: Prince George leaves Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau hanging in failed high-five
Telegraph: Duchess of Cambridge’s style: What Kate wore in Canada
Telegraph: The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’s royal tour of Canada – in pictures
Telegraph: The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge charm Canada as they bond with fellow parents on their first ever royal tour with both George and Charlotte
Telegraph: Duke of Cambridge hailed as ‘one of the guys’ as royal couple meet rescue services with the Trudeaus

Make sure to get the latest news updates as soon as they’re posted. Register today as a member of Unofficial Royalty. It’s quick and easy, and completely free! Click the ‘Register’ link in the menu to the right.

Prince Augustus, Duke of Sussex

by Susan Flantzer

Credit – Wikipedia

Prince Augustus, Duke of Sussex is infamously known for making two marriages in contravention of the Royal Marriages Act 1772.  He was born at the Queen’s House (now Buckingham Palace) in London on January 27, 1773, the sixth son and the ninth of the fifteen children of King George III of the United Kingdom and Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. On February 25, 1773, he was christened Augustus Frederick in the Great Council Chamber at St. James’s Palace by Frederick Cornwallis, Archbishop of Canterbury. His godparents were:

Augustus had fourteen siblings:

George III children

Queen Charlotte painted by Benjamin West in 1779 with her 13 eldest children; Photo Credit – http://www.royalcollection.org.uk

Augustus and his siblings were raised by their governess Lady Charlotte Finch who served the Royal Family for over 30 years. Lady Charlotte supervised the royal nursery and was responsible for the princes’ education until they lived in their own households and for the princesses until they turned 21. After leaving the nursery, Augustus lived in a household with his brothers Ernest and Adolphus near the royal residence Kew Palace, and the three brothers were educated by private tutors. In 1786, Ernest, Adolphus, and Augustus were sent to the University of Göttingen in Hanover (Germany) under the supervision of Georg Christoph Lichtenberg, a mathematics and physics professor.

Augustus by Thomas Gainsborough, 1782; Credit -Wikipedia

Augustus suffered from asthma and because of that, a military career was considered inappropriate. He was quite ill during the summer of 1790 and was confined to his room for five weeks. His doctors advised him to avoid the winter in England, so in December of 1790, he began a journey through southern France and Italy, which would ultimately last a few years. On his travels, Augustus met a young English man who had also attended the University of Göttingen, Josiah Dornford. Donford’s father was active in prison reform and this young man’s liberal views influenced Augustus.

In August of 1791, Augustus was still traveling through France and Italy. At that time, he considered becoming a cleric in the Church of England and so he wrote to his father: “…at a moment when in some measure the Church of England is attacked, nothing can give it more strength than your Majesty’s giving one of your sons a place in it.” King George III never answered Augustus’ letter, and so he continued wandering around Europe, becoming more and more restless.

Augustus by French painter Louis Gauffier, 1793; Credit – Wikipedia

Augustus went to Rome in November of 1792, where there was a group of English aristocrats living abroad. He met Lady Augusta Murray, exactly five years older than him to the day, the daughter of John Murray, 4th Earl of Dunmore and Lady Charlotte Stewart, daughter of Alexander Stewart, 6th Earl of Galloway. Lord Dunmore had been Governor of the Province of New York, Governor of the Province of Virginia, and Royal Governor of the Bahamas. Augustus fell passionately in love with Augusta.

Lady Augusta Murray; Credit – Wikipedia

In January of 1793, Augustus once again wrote to his father: “…should your Majesty think my presence of any use at this moment in England you have only to order…” , and once again, King George III did not answer. Frustrated and bored, Augustus felt his life had no direction. He proposed marriage to Augusta without the knowledge of anyone in the Royal Family. In 1772, the Royal Marriages Act was passed because two brothers of King George III had made marriages that the King considered very unsuitable. The Royal Marriages Act said that no descendant of King George II, other than the issue of princesses who had married into foreign families, could marry without the consent of the sovereign. In addition, any member of the Royal Family over the age of 25 who had been refused the sovereign’s consent could marry one year after giving notice to the Privy Council of their intention to so marry, unless both houses of Parliament declared their disapproval. Any marriage in contravention of the act was void, and any children would be illegitimate and not have any succession rights. A member of the Royal Family who contracted such a marriage would not lose his or her place in the succession. Augustus was only 20 years old and needed his father’s permission to marry.

At first, Augusta refused Augustus’ proposal because of the situation their marriage would place Augustus regarding the Royal Marriages Act. However, this only fueled Augustus’ passion and he would not take “no” for an answer to his proposal. On April 4, 1793, after Augusta’s mother had left the Hotel Sarmiento for the evening, where they were staying in Rome, Augustus and a Church of England cleric entered the hotel. The marriage ceremony was performed without witnesses and all three swore to keep it secret, although Augusta’s mother was apparently told. In August of 1793, Augustus was recalled to England because his governor, who had no idea that a marriage had taken place, had alerted Augustus’ parents that he was forming a dangerous relationship. Augusta and her mother followed him back to England, and Augustus continued visiting them in their London home. By this time, Augusta was pregnant.

During the autumn of 1793, banns of marriage for a Mr. Augustus Frederick and a Miss Augusta Murray were read at St. George’s, Hanover Square, in London without suspicion of the couple’s true identities. On December 5, 1793, a very pregnant Miss Augusta Murray and a Mr. Augustus Frederick were married at the church. The bride explained that they had been married in Italy when the groom was under age, and that they wanted to be remarried in England. On January 13, 1794, Augusta gave birth to a boy, named after his father, Augustus Frederick.

King George III was greatly angered by the marriage, and it was declared null and void in August of 1794. Despite this, Augustus and Augusta continued to live together. Another child, a daughter named Augusta Emma, was born in London on August 11, 1801. The two children, who were deemed illegitimate, used the last name D’Este as both their parents were descendants of the House of Este. In 1801, apparently some kind of deal was brokered and the couple separated. Augustus was created Duke of Sussex, Earl of Inverness, and Baron Arklow and received a parliamentary grant of £12,000. Augusta retained custody of the children and received £4,000 a year. On March 5, 1830, Augusta died at the age of 62 in Ramsgate, Kent, England. Augustus was saddened at her death :”When one looks back to events of thirty seven years ago one cannot do it without a sigh.”

Augustus Duke of Sussex 2

Augustus, Duke of Sussex, 1812; Credit – Royal Collection Trust/© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2016

Augustus and Augusta’s son, Augustus Frederick D’Este was an active member of the Aborigines Protection Society and was particularly interested in Native Americans. He was also the earliest recorded person for whom a definite diagnosis of multiple sclerosis can be made. The diagnosis was made in 1948 after the discovery of the diaries he kept for 22 years detailing his symptoms. He never married, probably due to his illness, and died 1848 at the age of 54.

The couple’s daughter Augusta Emma D’Este married Thomas Wilde, 1st Baron Truro, but their marriage was childless. Like her father, she suffered from asthma and spent time in the warmer climates of Europe to ease her symptoms. Augusta kept in touch with her father and spent time at court attending Queen Adelaide, the wife of her uncle King William IV. She died in 1866 at the age of 65.

Augusta Emma D’Este; Credit – Wikipedia

After the death of Augusta in 1830, Augustus married again in contravention of the Royal Marriages Act. He had become friendly with a widow, Lady Cecilia Buggin.  Lady Cecilia was the eldest daughter of Arthur Gore, 2nd Earl of Arran and Elizabeth Underwood. Augustus and Cecilia married at Great Cumberland Place in London, on May 2, 1831. Because marriage was not considered legal, Cecilia could not take the style and title Her Royal Highness The Duchess of Sussex, so instead she assumed the surname Underwood, her mother’s maiden name, and was known as Lady Cecilia Underwood. The couple lived at Augustus’ apartments in Kensington Palace.

Cecilia Underwood, Duchess of Inverness; Credit – Wikipedia

In 1837, Augustus’ niece succeeded to the throne as Queen Victoria. Neither Victoria’s mother nor Lord Melbourne, her mentor and first Prime Minister, had anything positive to say about her uncles, but Augustus had always been genuinely fond of his niece. Queen Victoria gave Augustus the respect she knew was due him. She appointed him Grand Master of the Order of the Bath. Augustus was also given the honor to move the Address to the Throne in the House of Lords at the first session of a new parliament in the new reign. At Queen Victoria’s coronation, Augustus received the biggest ovation from the crowd of all Victoria’s aunts and uncles on their way to and from Westminster Abbey.

Augustus, Duke of Sussex; Credit – Royal Collection Trust/© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2016

However, Augustus’ biggest honor was yet to come. Victoria requested that Lord Melbourne write to Augustus to ask if he would give her away at her marriage to Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha “as her nearest relation in this country and one who stands in the place of a Father.” Augustus was overjoyed to accept and sobbed emotionally throughout the wedding ceremony. As a token of her gratitude, Queen Victoria created Augustus’ wife Cecilia Duchess of Inverness in her own right in 1840. Protocol had created problems with Cecilia’s precedence at court and from then on these problems would be resolved. In 1841, Augustus was one of the godparents at the christening of Queen Victoria’s first child, Victoria, Princess Royal.

Queen Victoria’s wedding, Augustus is wearing the black cap, standing to the right of Queen Victoria; Credit – Wikipedia

On April 21, 1843, Augustus died from erysipelas at the age of 70 with his brother Adolphus and his wife Cecilia at his bedside. Because Augustus feared that Cecilia would not be allowed to be buried in the Royal Vault at St. George’s Chapel, Windsor, he left instructions that he be buried at Kensal Green Cemetery in Kensal Green, London, England, where he was buried in front of the main chapel, opposite the tomb of his sister Princess Sophia. His wife Cecilia continued to live at Kensington Palace and survived him by 30 years, dying on August 1, 1873 at the age of 88. She was buried next to Augustus at Kensal Green Cemetery.

Grave of Prince Augustus, Duke of Sussex; Photo Credit – Wikipedia

Wikipedia: Prince Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex

Works Cited
“Prince Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex.” Wikipedia. N.p.: Wikimedia Foundation, 21 July 2016. Web. 13 Aug. 2016.
“Lady Augusta Murray.” Wikipedia. N.p.: Wikimedia Foundation, 28 May 2016. Web. 13 Aug. 2016.
“Cecilia Underwood, Duchess of Inverness.” Wikipedia. N.p.: Wikimedia Foundation, 28 May 2016. Web. 13 Aug. 2016.
Van Der Kiste, John. George III’s Children. Trowbridge: Alan Sutton Publishing Limited, 1999. Print.
Williamson, David. Brewer’s British Royalty. London: Cassell, 1996. Print.

September 26 – Today in Royal History

King Christian X of Denmark, Photo Credit – Wikipedia

September 26, 1087 – Coronation of King William II Rufus of England
Unofficial Royalty: King William II Rufus of England

September 26, 1870 – Birth of King Christian X of Denmark at Charlottenlund Palace in Gentofte Municipality near Copenhagen, Denmark
Full name: Christian Carl Frederik Albert Alexander Vilhelm
Unofficial Royalty: King Christian X of Denmark

September 26, 2000 – Birth of Princess Salma bint Abdullah, daughter of King Abdullah II of Jordan, in Amman, Jordan
Wikipedia: Princess Salma bint Abdullah